Policies and Procedures Related to COVID-19

Cosmetic Dentist in Wall

We are committed to the health and safety of our patients, staff, doctors, and communities. Given the current Coronavirus (COVID-19) situation, we are taking the following additional steps on top of our already comprehensive standard infection control procedures, which have been developed over years of use for other bacterial and viral contagions:

  • Reinforced comprehensive infection control procedures with our team members, which include frequent hand washing, use of clean masks and gloves with every patient, and disinfection of all surfaces in the treatment rooms, restrooms, and waiting room/reception areas.
  • Increased frequency of thorough cleaning and disinfecting of all areas of the office.
  • Patients who present for care will have their temperature taken, using a touch-less thermometer, prior to any dental therapy being completed and after a risk survey questionnaire has been completed.
  • Instructed our team members to not report to work if they have recently traveled internationally or if they have flu-like symptoms.

We are actively monitoring the national and local COVID-19 situation and will respond as appropriate. We are adhering to the policies and recommendations set forth by the Pennsylvania Department of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Please consider rescheduling your appointment if either of the following apply to you:

  • You or anyone in your immediate family has traveled internationally within the last 30 days.
  • You or anyone in your family are experiencing cold or flu-like symptoms.

If you have an appointment scheduled and would like to reschedule, then please contact us at 412-687-2005 or monahandds4760@gmail.com.

We take great pride in serving our surrounding communities. At this time, we will continue to serve our surrounding communities and remain open for patient care. We ask that you refrain from bringing more than one family member or friend to your appointment with you. The recommendations and policies associated with Coronavirus are likely to change and this memorandum is subject to being updated as new information becomes available.

Our very best,

Bloomfield Dental Team

Dentist in Pittsburgh | Are Your Drinks Attacking Your Teeth?

Cosmetic Dentist in Wall

If carbonated soft drinks are part of your normal daily routine, you may be causing serious damage to your teeth. Recent studies have found soft drinks to be among the most potent dietary causes of tooth decay. Soft drinks have also been implicated in increases of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and other serious health conditions. Before you shop for beverages this week, consider a few things you should know about soft drinks.

Most soft drinks contain substantial amounts of sugars, which interact with the bacteria in your mouth. This interaction produces a form of acid that can damage your teeth for about 20 minutes. Each time you take a drink, you reset that time window. If you consume throughout the day, you are essentially bathing your teeth in that beverage for hours.

Most soft drinks contain acids, as well. Even sugar-free varieties contain acids that can weaken the enamel on your teeth. Colas and citrus-flavored soft drinks tend to have the highest levels of acid. Over time, this weakening of tooth enamel has a cumulative effect. This can lead to decay and even tooth loss if not addressed in early stages.

Obviously, the best solution is to stop consuming carbonated soft drinks. However, it can be a difficult habit to break. Here are some tips to help reduce your risks of tooth damage from these beverages:

  • Drink in moderation. Too much sugar and acid will eventually cause damage.
  • Try sparkling water. This provides the fizzy sensation without all the sugar and acid.
  • Drink more water. You will crave soft drinks less when you are fully hydrated.
  • Don’t sip. The longer you spend drinking, the more time sugars and acids are reacting with your teeth.
  • Use a straw. This can help keep the sugars and acids away from your teeth.
  • Rinse with water after drinking to dilute acids and sugars.
  • Don’t brush immediately. Wait at least 30 minutes for acids to be neutralized by saliva before brushing.
  • Practice good dental hygiene, including brushing, flossing, and regular professional cleanings and exams.

Carbonated soft drinks can be harmful to your oral and overall health. Be mindful of how often you consume them and consider reducing or stopping your use of these dangerous beverages. If your teeth are already showing the effects of weakness and discoloration, dental veneers are a strong and stain-resistant cosmetic solution.

For more oral health tips or to schedule an appointment, contact our office.

4760 Liberty Ave.
Pittsburg, PA 15224

Phone: (412) 867-2005

15224 Dentist | Coffee and Your Teeth

Cosmetic Dentist in Wall

Coffee is well-known as hazardous to teeth, but there are things you can do besides cut it out completely. Here are some things to know about coffee’s effects on your oral health and diet, as well as how to mitigate them.

Contrary to popular belief, the pigments that give coffee its color can stain your teeth regardless of whether you take your coffee black or with cream. These pigments embed themselves in microscopic crevices and pits in your tooth enamel and are difficult to remove. To counteract this, don’t give the pigments time to set. When drinking coffee, drink quickly instead of sipping over a long period. Enjoy, then rinse your mouth with water to help neutralize the acid. In addition, following your recommended schedule of dental cleanings can help prevent stains. Whitening can improve the color of your teeth if mild staining has started. Ask our doctor how best to keep your smile bright.

Coffee can have minor benefits for your nutrition, but there are also things to beware. Drinks that are high in dairy fat or sugar can add substantial calories, as well as contributing to the chance of tooth decay. Try making your own coffee at home, where you can control the ingredients used. Minimize your use of creamer and sugar, or try using non-fat or sugar-free substitutes.

Coffee can still be a healthy party of your life if you take some care to protect your teeth. For more tips or to schedule a professional cleaning, contact our office.

4760 Liberty Ave.
Pittsburg, PA 15224

Phone: (412) 867-2005

Pittsburgh Dentist | The Truth Behind “Natural Whitening” Fads

Cosmetic Dentist in Wall

It seems like there is a new headline nearly every week featuring someone who swears their teeth are whiter and brighter due to their natural home remedy for stain removal. These articles showcase the idea that whitening can be cheap and easy, if in some cases unpleasant. It can be tempting to consider trying for brighter, whiter teeth without investing time and money on in-office or at-home whitening under a dentist’s care. However, before you pin your hopes on one of these “natural whitening” methods, take a look at the truth behind some of the recent fads.

Fad 1: Oil Pulling

Oil pulling has been cropping up in headlines for months with claims of a wide variety of potential health benefits. It is a very old folk remedy in which a person swishes a tablespoon of edible oil, such as coconut, sunflower, olive, etc., in their mouth and between teeth for up to 20 minutes daily.

Despite the number of years this practice has existed and the number of health issues it purports to treat, there is no evidence that oil pulling whitens teeth or improves health.

Fad 2: Fruits

Due to celebrity endorsement, some people have begun to try rubbing mashed strawberries on their teeth to try to achieve a whiter smile. Others are using lemon or orange peels, and still others tout the virtues of eating pineapple or swishing apple cider vinegar.

However, there is no science to support any of these claims. In fact, one recent study found that brushing with a mixture of baking soda (which is known to have whitening effects on teeth) and strawberries did not whiten teeth. Even worse, the citric acids found in all of these fruits and vinegars can actually be harmful to the enamel on your teeth.

Fad 3: Hydrogen Peroxide

While it is true that many forms of in-office and over-the-counter teeth whitening make use of hydrogen peroxide, there is more to consider before opening a bottle. The hydrogen peroxide used in professional teeth whitening, whether in-office or at-home, is mixed with other substances and provided in a form designed for use in teeth whitening.

Simply swishing from a bottle of hydrogen peroxide will have little or no effect on the whiteness of your teeth, but may cause irritation to your gums and mouth and can be dangerous if accidentally ingested.

If you want whiter, brighter teeth, there are safe and effective ways to achieve your goal. Talk with our doctor for a recommendation for what kind of whitening will be best for your needs. For more information about whitening, contact our office.

4760 Liberty Ave.
Pittsburg, PA 15224

Phone: (412) 867-2005

Bloomfield Dental